WHO global health days

Key messages for World Immunization Week 2018

OVERARCHING MESSAGE

We can ensure vaccines reach the people that need them most. We can be protected together.

FOR USE ON ENGAGED PUBLIC DAY (APRIL 24)

When people ensure that their families and communities are protected with vaccines, we are all protected together.

  • Vaccines save and improve lives.
    • Immunization is estimated to save 2-3 million lives every year – equivalent to the entire population of city (1).
    • Yet, too many people still aren’t reached with these life-saving tools - globally, one in seven children are excluded from the full benefits of vaccines.
  • Vaccines protect people from more than deadly diseases.
    • If we increase vaccine coverage in low- and middle-income countries by 2030, we could prevent 24 million people from falling into poverty due to health expenses (2).

FOR USE ON HEALTH WORKER DAY (APRIL 26)

Frontline vaccinators combat deadly diseases to ensure we remain protected together.

  • To eradicate polio, millions of courageous health workers, many of whom operate in difficult or dangerous conditions, work tirelessly to reach and protect all children with polio vaccines.
    • These workers not only protect children against the disease – they pave the way for other health programs to reach the world’s most vulnerable children.
  • Through routine immunization programs, health workers bring life-saving vaccines to people around the world, while helping provide other basic health care services.
    • In 2016 alone, health workers immunized more than 62 million children in the world’s poorest countries, which equates to over 185 million points of contact between these children and the primary health care system (3).
  • Health workers’ efforts to increase immunization builds the foundation for strong primary health care and is a route toward universal health coverage.

FOR USE ON DONOR/LEADER DAY (APRIL 27)

It’s vital that donors continue to invest in immunization – only then can we be protected together.

  • Vaccines are one of the most cost-effective health tools ever invented.
    • Every $1 spent on childhood immunization returns $44 in economic and social benefits (4).
  • From saving lives to preventing poverty, to safeguarding against malnutrition, vaccines allow people around the world to live full and healthy lives.
    • They are vital to achieving global development goals—even those not directly related to health.
      • For example, one study found that if we increase vaccine coverage in low- and middle-income countries by 2030, we could prevent 24 million people from falling into poverty due to health expenses (5).
      • Other studies have found that vaccinating children against measles can result in improved performance in schools (6).

Notes

(1) North America – Chicago; South America – Buenos Aires; Europe – Rome; Africa – Nairobi; Asia – Taipei.
(2) Chang, Angela Y., et al. “The Equity Impact Vaccines May Have On Averting Deaths And Medical Impoverishment In Developing Countries,” Health Affairs 37.2 (2018).
(3) Gavi – Facts and Figures
(4) Ozawa, Sachiko, et al. "Return On Investment From Childhood Immunization In Low-And Middle-Income Countries, 2011–20." Health Affairs 35.2 (2016): 199-207.
(5) Chang, Angela Y., et al. “The Equity Impact Vaccines May Have On Averting Deaths And Medical Impoverishment In Developing Countries,” Health Affairs 37.2 (2018).
(6) Anekwe, T., Newell, M., Tanser, F., et al. 2015. The causal effect of childhood measles vaccination on educational attainment: A mother fixed-effects study in rural South Africa. Vaccine. 33:5020-6.

World Immunization Week 2018

Countdown to World Immunization Week,
24-30 April 2018