Intestinal worms

WHO data show unprecedented treatment coverage for bilharzia and intestinal worms

©The END Fund

14 December 2018 | Geneva -- It is likely that countries endemic for schistosomiasis (bilharzia) and soil-transmitted helminthiases (intestinal worms) will be able to treat 75% of school-aged children by 2020 – the target set by the NTD Roadmap developed by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 2012. In 2017, almost 99 million people were treated.
This includes 81.1 million school-aged children, representing 68% coverage worldwide.
For intestinal worms, 598.1 million children were treated -188 million preschool-aged and 410.1 million school-aged children - representing 69% coverage worldwide.

Paediatric chewable medicine promises improved treatment against intestinal worms

20 June 2018 | Geneva -- The World Health Organization (WHO) will soon make a paediatric formulation (500-mg chewable tablet) of mebendazole available to requesting countries for large-scale deworming interventions. Mebendazole – an anthelmintic (antiparasitic) is one of the medicines recommended by WHO against intestinal worm infections.
Non-chewable tablets currently distributed by WHO will continue to be donated to treat school-age children (5 years and above), while the newly available tablets will target children below that age.
Both formulations are donated to WHO by the pharmaceutical company Johnson & Johnson.

Deworming: every girl and every woman has the right to be treated

©BHA

2 February 2018 | Geneva –– Nutrition and maternal health experts strongly favour the deworming of girls and women of reproductive age who are infected with soil-transmitted helminthiases (intestinal worms).

Approximately 688 million girls and women live in areas of more than 100 countries which are endemic for intestinal worms.

The call from the experts comes after they recently endorsed the 'Bellagio Declaration'.

WHO publishes recommendations for large-scale deworming to improve children’s health and nutrition

© WHO

29 September 2017 | Geneva -- The World Health Organization (WHO) publishes recommendations for large-scale deworming to improve children’s health and nutrition.

WHO has long promoted large-scale treatment for intestinal worms, but this is the first evidence-based guideline confirming that deworming decreases and prevents the intensity (severity) of infection and improves the health and nutrient uptake of children.

Number of deworming tablets for school age children requested for 2018.
Read more

Videos

Deadly Worms!!! – A look at Soil Transmitted Helminths

Basic laboratory methods in human parasitology

Collection of video tutorials to learn how to process with basic laboratory methods in human parasitology, based on the examination of fecal and urine specimens

Learn about the disease

If you have any queries, please do not hesitate to contact us at Email:wormcontrol@who.int