Ionizing radiation

Communicating radiation risks in paediatric imaging now also available in Portuguese

7 December 2018 – The Portuguese Edition of the document “Communicating Radiation Risks in Paediatric Imaging” (in Portuguese: “Comunicar os Riscos da Radiação em Imagiologia Pediátrica“) is now available.
It will be launched at a seminar to be held in Coimbra, Portugal, on 12th December 2018, hosted by the Escola Superior de Tecnologia da Saúde de Coimbra (ESTeSC/ Coimbra Health School).

Release of the Spanish version of Communicating radiation risks in paediatric imaging

 Billington Jesse Semwogerere and his mom Victoria Nandagire have a conversation with Dr. Deborah Babirye at Ecurei-Mengo Hospital (Kampala, Uganda) about the risk of radiation during diagnostic testing, such as a CT scan.
E.N. Kawooya, Ecurei-Mengo Hospital (Uganda)

24 July 2018 -- WHO organized a webinar in cooperation with the Latin-American Network of Radiation Protection in Medicine to present the Spanish Edition of this document . It was entitled “Communication Strategies and Tools to Support Ris-Benefit Dialogue in Pediatric Radiology” (in Spanish: “Estrategias y Herramientas de Comunicacion para Apoyar el Dialogo Riesgo-Beneficio en el Ambito de la Radiologia Pediatrica”)

WHO Global Initiative on Radiation Safety in Health Care Settings

Delegates at the WHO HQ, Geneva during 15th to 17th December 2008 for the Technical Meeting on the WHO Global Initiative on Radiation Safety in Healthcare Settings.
WHO
Delegates at the WHO HQ, Geneva during 15th to 17th December 2008 for the Technical Meeting on the WHO Global Initiative on Radiation Safety in Healthcare Settings.

WHO is conducting a Global Initiative on Radiation Safety in Health Care Settings to mobilize the health sector towards safe and effective use of radiation in medicine. By integrating radiation protection into the concepts of good medical practice and health care service quality, this initiative provides a platform for collaboration between health authorities, radiation protection regulators, international agencies, professional societies, patient networks, scientific bodies, academic institutions and other stakeholders to improve the implementation of radiation safety standards in healthcare settings.

Communicating radiation risks in paediatric imaging

 Billington Jesse Semwogerere and his mom Victoria Nandagire have a conversation with Dr. Deborah Babirye at Ecurei-Mengo Hospital (Kampala, Uganda) about the risk of radiation during diagnostic testing, such as a CT scan.
E.N. Kawooya, Ecurei-Mengo Hospital (Uganda)

April 2018 -- Dialogue with patients and families is particularly relevant in the field of paediatric imaging. Accurate and effective radiation risk communication is also necessary between health care providers who request or perform radiological medical procedures in children. The WHO document Communicating radiation risks in paediatric imaging: information to support health care discussions about benefit and risk is intended to serve as a tool for health care providers to communicate known or potential radiation risks associated with paediatric imaging procedures, to support risk-benefit dialogue in health care settings. WHO launched this document at a Webinar held on 22 April 2016.

Diagnostic imaging

x-ray image
Diagnostic imaging team

Imaging for medical purposes involves a team which includes the service of radiologists, radiographers (X-ray technologists), sonographers (ultrasound technologists), medical physicists, nurses, biomedical engineers, and other support staff working together to optimize the wellbeing of patients, one at a time. Appropriate use of medical imaging requires a multidisciplinary approach.

Bonn Call for Action

The “International Conference on Radiation Protection in Medicine: Achieving Change in Practice” took place in Vienna between 11 and 15 December 2017, organized by the IAEA, co-sponsored by WHO and PAHO. It was convened as a follow-up of the a similar Conference held in Bonn, Germany (2012), which identified 10 priority actions to improve radiation protection in medicine known as the “Bonn Call for Action”.

Justification of medical exposures

Corbis www.fotosearch.com

The system of radiological protection aims to control radiation risks without unduly limiting the potential benefits for individuals and for society. The new International Radiation Basic Safety Standards (BSS) have expanded the requirements for justification of medical exposures pand optimization of protection and safety in medicine.

Radiation safety culture in medicine

WHO, IRPA, IOMP and IAEA are cooperating on a project on Radiation Safety Culture in Health Care, open to national/regional and international partners. The purpose of this project is the development of a framework document to support the establishment and maintenance of a radiation safety culture in health-care facilities, as an integral component of safety culture programmes in medical settings.

Contact us

ionizingradiation@who.int

Radiation Programme
Department of Public Health and Environment
World Health Organization
CH1211 Geneva 27
Switzerland