Schistosomiasis

WHO data show unprecedented treatment coverage for bilharzia and intestinal worms

©The END Fund

14 December 2018 | Geneva -- It is likely that countries endemic for schistosomiasis (bilharzia) and soil-transmitted helminthiases (intestinal worms) will be able to treat 75% of school-aged children by 2020 – the target set by the NTD Roadmap developed by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 2012. In 2017, almost 99 million people were treated.
This includes 81.1 million school-aged children, representing 68% coverage worldwide.
For intestinal worms, 598.1 million children were treated -188 million preschool-aged and 410.1 million school-aged children - representing 69% coverage worldwide.

Female genital schistosomiasis: simultaneous screening of diseases can improve reproductive health

20 July 2018 | Geneva −− Addressing multiple health problems simultaneously can help to address female genital schistosomiasis (FGS) which predisposes women to infections such as the human immunodeficiency virus. WHO and the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) are expected to discuss how to combine the screening and testing of infections to improve their detection and treatment. The discussions will take place during the 22nd International AIDS Conference in Amsterdam, Netherlands on 23–27 July 2018.

Schistosomiasis: WHO reports substantial treatment progress for school-age children

©United Nations

8 December 2017 | Geneva –– Countries endemic for schistosomiasis (bilharzia) have substantially scaled-up treatment of school-age children.
Data for 2016 published by the World Health Organization (WHO) show almost 71 million school children were treated, with 12 countries in Africa achieving 75% coverage.
The focus now is to extend treatment to adults, particularly women.
It is estimated that between 20 – 56 million young and adult women suffer from female genital schistosomiasis (FGS).

Egypt leverages domestic funding to eliminate schistosomiasis

People are infected during routine agricultural, domestic,
occupational and recreational activities which expose
them to infested water. © Roland Buzzi

29 November 2016 | Geneva | Cairo −− The World Health Organization (WHO) will support Egypt in implementing a domestically funded US$ 10 million project aimed at eliminating schistosomiasis.

The project, spread out over five years, also involves snail control and the promotion of other public health interventions such as access to safe water, sanitation and health education.

WHO convenes experts to sustain progress against soil-transmitted helminthiases and schistosomiasis

25 November 2016 | Geneva –– An important meeting aimed at accelerating efforts towards achieving coverage of 75% of the world’s preschool-aged and school-aged children treated for intestinal parasitic worms and schistosomes (bilharzia) gets underway on Monday 28 November 2016.
Discussions will include finding ways to encourage the production of medicines; ensure their availability to meet growing demand; future plans to reach adult populations; and, the development of an appropriate methodology to verify interruption of transmission.

people treated worldwide in 2015

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