About us

TDR, the Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases, is a global programme of scientific collaboration that helps facilitate, support and influence efforts to combat diseases of poverty. It is hosted at the World Health Organization (WHO), and is sponsored by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the World Bank and WHO.

Our vision

“The health and well-being of people burdened by infectious diseases of poverty is improved through research and innovation.”

Our Mission

“To support effective and innovative global health research, through strengthening the research capacity of disease-affected countries, and promoting the translation of evidence into interventions that reduce the burden of infectious diseases and build resilience in the most vulnerable populations.”

Key documents

Key publications

Call for applications

 
To carry out research on sexual and reproductive health and rights and infectious diseases of poverty linked to mass migration in the Americas.

TDR Global launches crowdfunding challenge to help researchers fund their own research future

 
We are launching an innovation challenge to identify individuals with promising infectious diseases research ideas in low- and middle-income settings to build their capacity to crowdfund their research.

TDR Global
is a community of passionate scientists and experts who have been working with TDR to support global research efforts on infectious diseases of poverty.

About TDR: Building the science of solutions

TDR, the Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR) is a global programme of scientific collaboration established in 1975. Its focus is to improve the health and well-being of people burdened by infectious diseases of poverty through research and innovation. TDR is hosted at the World Health Organization (WHO), and is sponsored by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the World Bank and WHO.