Latest homepage stories

Below are the most recent top stories from the WHO homepage.

Health centres in Nigeria treat severely malnourished children

17 March 2017 – An estimated 400 000 children in northeast Nigeria are currently suffering from severe acute malnutrition. Two-year-old Umar is slowly regaining his health after receiving care and medicine from a WHO supported stabilization centre.

The road to universal health coverage in the Solomon Islands

16 March 2017 – In a nation of 620 000 people dispersed over more than 600 islands, patients travel for days by truck and boat to receive medical care. A bold new plan is restructuring available health resources, setting out the Pacific nation’s roadmap towards universal health coverage while ensuring efficient use of resources at strategic locations.

Health care a casualty of 6 years of war in the Syrian Arab Republic

15 March 2017 – This week the conflict in the Syrian Arab Republic enters its seventh year. Over the past 6 years access to health services for civilians in the country has seriously deteriorated. More than half of public hospitals and primary health centres in the Syrian Arab Republic have either closed or are only partially functioning. Almost two–thirds of health care workers have fled.

Eradicating yaws

14 March 2017 – India was declared free of yaws in 2016, yet 13 countries, with a combined population of 89 million people, still remain endemic for the disease.

Field studies have confirmed that a single dose of oral azithromycin is enough to cure the disease. Interrupting transmission in some countries by 2020 is possible, provided a sustainable supply of azithromycin is available.

Eradicating yaws

A man examines the leg of a child with yaws in Indonesia, 1957.
WHO

10 March 2017 – India was declared free of yaws in 2016, yet 13 countries, with a combined population of 89 million people, still remain endemic for the disease.

Field studies have confirmed that a single dose of oral azithromycin is enough to cure the disease. Interrupting transmission in some countries by 2020 is possible, provided a sustainable supply of azithromycin is available.

Kidney patients struggle as Yemeni health crisis worsens

9 March 2017 -- In recent months, with internally displaced people flooding into Al-Hudaydah governorate, Yemen, the number of patients receiving haemodialysis treatment, to treat kidney failure, in one centre has risen to over 600, despite the centre’s capacity of 400. WHO has provided some of the dialysis centres with equipment, IV fluids and fuel to operate generators. However, on World Kidney Day it is important to note that more support is needed.

Women who decide on their health have brighter futures

8 March 2017 – Access to contraception can allow adolescent girls and young women to stay in school longer, opening up better economic opportunities and more independent, fulfilling futures. Every additional year of schooling for a girl increases her future earnings by 10% to 20%. On International Women’s Day, WHO calls for unequivocal commitment to gender equality and women’s and girls’ fundamental rights.

Tuberculosis: "Leave No One Behind"

7 March 2017 – World TB Day celebrated on 24 March each year, is an opportunity to raise awareness about the burden of tuberculosis (TB) worldwide and the status of TB prevention and care efforts. This year, WHO places a special focus on uniting efforts to "Leave no one behind", including actions to address stigma, discrimination, marginalization and overcome barriers to access care.

Environmental pollution kills 1.7 million children each year

6 March 2017 – Environmental risks cause more than 1 in 4 deaths in children aged under 5 years every year, according to 2 new reports from WHO. Children are especially vulnerable to pollution due to their developing organs and immune systems, and smaller bodies and airways. The most common causes of death – diarrhoea, malaria and pneumonia – are preventable with safe water and clean cooking fuels.

On World Hearing Day, WHO calls for sound investment

3 March 2017 – There are 360 million people in the world with disabling hearing loss. Unaddressed hearing loss costs approximately US$ 750 billion. Prevention, screening for early identification, rehabilitation through hearing devices, captioning and sign language education are among the strategies which can mitigate hearing loss and its consequences.

Validating information on vaccine safety

1 March 2017 – When parents and caregivers need credible information about vaccines for their children, they often look to the internet first. In recent years, however, a number of websites have been publishing unbalanced and misleading information on vaccine safety. In response, network of validated vaccine safety websites, called Vaccine Safety Net, has been created to provide accurate and trustworthy information about vaccines.

New antibiotics needed for 12 families of bacteria

27 February 2017 – WHO’s list of antibiotic-resistant "priority pathogens" include bacteria that pose the greatest threat to human health. The list is intended to guide and promote research and development of new antibiotics in an effort to address growing global resistance to antimicrobial medicines.

About 17 million people are affected by crisis in the Lake Chad Basin

23 February 2017 – Years of violent conflict have deprived millions of people in north-eastern Nigeria, northern Cameroon, western Chad and south-east Niger of even the most basic health care services. Malnutrition is widespread and in the 3 worst-affected states of Nigeria nearly 6 million men, women, children and infants urgently need health assistance. WHO is working with the Nigerian Ministry of Health and partners to reach those in need with lifesaving health care.

Number of people with depression increases

23 February 2017 – The number of people living with depression is increasing, 18% between 2005 and 2015. In the lead-up to World Health Day on 7 April, which this year will focus on this increasingly important issue, WHO is releasing today a new global report on health estimates on depression.

Migrant Health: Resetting the agenda

21 February 2017 – The health problems of refugees and migrants are similar to those of the rest of the population. The most frequent health problems of newly arrived refugees and migrants include accidental injuries, hypothermia, burns, cardiovascular events, pregnancy and delivery-related complications, diabetes, and hypertension. Stakeholders are discussing improving their health aspects, in the 2nd Global Consultation on Migrant Health, on 21–23 February 2017, in Colombo, Sri Lanka.

2nd Global Consultation on Migrant Health: Resetting the agenda

21 February 2017 – Member States, international organizations, academia, non-governmental organizations, and other stakeholders are engaging in a meaningful platform for multisectoral dialogue and commitment to discuss the health aspects of refugees and migrants, in the 2nd Global Consultation on Migrant Health, on 21–23 February 2017, in Colombo, Sri Lanka.

WHO teams assist people in hard-to-reach areas of Nigeria

17 February 2017 – Medical teams supported by WHO set up mobile clinics in hard to access areas of north-eastern Nigeria. The teams are called "hard-to-reach" teams (HTR) because their mission is to reach remote and insecure areas to provide urgently needed care to populations deprived of essential health services. Two-thirds of hospitals, clinics and other health facilities in the most affected states have been completely or partially damaged.

Yellow fever outbreak ends in Angola and Democratic Republic of the Congo

14 February 2017 – The Democratic Republic of Congo declared the end of the yellow fever outbreak following a similar announcement in Angola on 23 December 2016, bringing an end to the outbreak in both countries after no new confirmed cases were reported from both countries for the past 6 months.

Reducing maternal and newborn deaths by half

14 February 2017 – Today, 9 countries – Bangladesh, Cote d’Ivoire, Ethiopia, Ghana, India, Malawi, Nigeria, Tanzania and Uganda – committed to halving preventable deaths of pregnant women and newborns in their health facilities within the next 5 years. Through a new network supported by WHO, UNICEF, and other partners, these countries will improve the quality of care mothers and babies receive.

Approximately 50 million people worldwide have epilepsy

13 February 2017 – Epilepsy is a chronic disorder of the brain that affects people worldwide. It is characterized by recurrent seizures. The estimated proportion of the general population with active epilepsy at a given time is between 4 and 10 per 1000 people. As an initiative established in 1997, WHO and partners are carrying out a global campaign – "Out of the Shadows" – to provide better information and raise awareness about epilepsy.